Transition to civilian life

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#81
It was nous, le petit caporal, at the battle of Austerlitz, who gave this title to an Adjudant, for charging the enemy... All the officiers were dead
Mon Sir, le petit caporal
That is exact. Well done that man! Napoleon was observing the battle of Austerlitz (I read somewhere that in those days it was kind of like playing chess, moving groups of men around the battle field). After one attack as Andy points out there were no officers left standing. So an Adjudant counter attacked with his peloton (platoon). Napoleon said "Mais quel est donc ce lieutenant si vaillant ?" Who is this lieutenant so valiant (courageous/determined)?
One of his aids answered "it's not a lieutenant, he is an adjudant', to which Napoleon replied as from now all adjudants will be addressed as "Mon Lieutenant" in the Cavalry.
 
#82
(...) I'm still pretending to look busy and thinking to myself this guy - the ML- has climbed the highest mountain in the UK, Ben Nevis, to be qualified as a Mountain and Arctic warfare Cadre and here he is saying that he failed the SBS. The Brigadier nodding as though he'd already come across others and asks the Cpl why he didn't try for the SAS.
His response impressed the Brigadier commanding the Special Air Service and the Army Catering Corps chef (no longer trying to look busy).
“Because I don't want to leave the corps (Royal Marines) Sir.”
Good post Joseph. Many of the Mountain Leaders preferred to stay where they were for various reasons. Some SAS have failed that very arduous course. Many overseas (Nato) SF operators undertake it. Mainly US, Dutch and strangely Norwegians. In my day it was known as the Cliff Assault Wing and I participated in a minor way. The great advantage of the old SBS being members of the Corps was that when they returned after SBS posting they disseminated skills within the Corps. The SAS not having a parent unit failed to pass on several skills to the Army per se. That of course is a case of 'Autres temps, autres moeurs'.
 
#83
The US Army allows this nonsense, everyone on the enlisted side is referred to as Private, Specialist, or Sergeant.
Not quite. When addressing Senior NCO's (i.e First Sergeants and Sergeants Major) we always used the full rank. Master Sergeants are a sort of middle ground; some insist on being addressed as "Master Sergeant", though most don't. You are correct in that Staff Sergeants and Sergeants First Class are addressed as "Sergeant", though.

We also mostly don't use nicknames for certain ranks as you sometimes do, like 'Gunny", 'Top", or 'Master Guns". The most notable exception being the Artillery, who address their Staff Sergeants as "Chief", and Sergeants First Class as 'Smoke'.

EDIT: I forgot about Corporals. They're pretty rare in the Army, but the few that do exist are addressed as 'Corporal".
 
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USMCRET

Active Member
#84
Not quite. When addressing Senior NCO's (i.e First Sergeants and Sergeants Major) we always used the full rank. Master Sergeants are a sort of middle ground; some insist on being addressed as "Master Sergeant", though most don't. You are correct in that Staff Sergeants and Sergeants First Class are addressed as "Sergeant", though.

We also mostly don't use nicknames for certain ranks as you sometimes do, like 'Gunny", 'Top", or 'Master Guns". The most notable exception being the Artillery, who address their Staff Sergeants as "Chief", and Sergeants First Class as 'Smoke'.

EDIT: I forgot about Corporals. They're pretty rare in the Army, but the few that do exist are addressed as 'Corporal".
Yeah we had those too, "Master Sergeants," most we called Top a respect thing. Not many Corporals in the Army
 

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