Training, Drugs, and Other Topics

USMCRET

Active Member
#1
I have been ruminating on this for a while, recent post of disillusionment with Corporals and Sergeants, Quitting after the Képi March while at additional training post farm, I'd call it MOS Training, and the complete and utter lack of understanding for what Military Service means, not what is glorified or imagined.

1st, weight Training, Running, and other forms of physical training. Yes, there are drug problems in every military unit in the world. Some worse than other, some drugs a blind eye is turned; however, drugs like meth, crack, or other drugs have a very real impact on the person, the unit, and the service in general. Others, steroids, seem to not have the hard eye looking at it. If the steroid use becomes a problem, discipline, or it manifest itself in other deleterious ways it has to be addressed. Weight Training, Strength Training, Endurance, and other forms of Physical Training are ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY. It is the NCO, the senior legionnaire Officer that know this well, COMBAT TAKES IN ORDINATE AMOUNTS OF STAMINA AND STRENGTH. As I am sure it is the same in the Legion, there is Organized PT for the Squad, Platoon, Battalion, and Regiment; however, that PT is more motivational and for Esprit de Corps. The individual has to do their part, a much larger part to become the warrior required. Everyday in the Marine Corps, Garrison time and to an extent while deployed, a Marine usually has lunch from 11:00 to 13:00 or so. The average Marine is not at the food court on base, he or she is either running again, weight training, or doing a combination of weights and aerobic training. Generally 2 to 3 times the amount of organized training. But what have we been hearing here, the Corporal, the Sergeant, the Adjutant is abusive. Did you ever stop to consider that on the battlefield any unit is only as strong as its weakest member? The Legion has it right, "March or Die!" This is harsh for some of you snowflakes to understand, but is necessary!

2nd, Oh, so you complete your Kepi March, Graduated from Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, All Marines know Marines are Made at San Diego and Female Marines at Parris Island, inside joke, and now you are a damned Field Marshall and ready foe command and authority, HA! I will show that dumbass Russian Sergeant or whatever nationality he is how it is done. Listen to me, you are a DUMBASS, HEED THIS, YOUR SKULL IS MUSH AND IT IS BEING FORMED. Why oh why do we have to sweep the parade deck, why do we have to march and learn the Legion and Unit Cadence? It is for discipline! It is not meant to make you happy and all feel good inside. Drill (Marching) is PURE DISCIPLINE! Things like by the Left Flank or Column Movements have their roots in ancient combat, think of the Napoleon era soldier or a Civil War Soldier, those Drill Commands were and still are COMBAT MANEUVERS. Even the worst NCO has something to offer to the formation of your military bearing, and the most favorite NCO is not doing you any favors by letting you slide, he is grooming you for failure, you are just to damned stupid to know it yet and you want to quit and renege on your contract because it is hard. If you do quit, you will one day and I absolutely know you will hate yourself for quitting, see your commitment through to the end. Go home or reenlist, but do so with your honor.

3rd and Final Diatribe, EVERYDAY IS NOT WHAT YOU IMAGINE MILITARY LIFE TO BE. There is the hurry up and wait routine. Example, if there is Battalion Formation at 06:00 that means your squad, your platoon and your Company will have already determined and be ready to report at exactly 06:00 to the Battalion Sergeant's Major Command Report! Company A, All Accounted for. This means if you arrive any later than 05:30 we would consider you UA, Unauthorized Absence. The Barracks have to be clean, you live in a community environment, your mom is not there to pick up after you, you can not live like a damned animal. There will be mundane things that have to be done. Weapons maintenance, vehicle maintenance, uniform inspections, and the list is never ending. You are not there to play Legionnaire or Marine, you are there to be one and all it entails. How much time do you aspirants think it takes to get all of those outstanding legionnaires to look perfect in uniform, to march down the Champs-Élysées avenue, and to hear the roaring expression of the crowd "Vive la Légion étrangère!" You are the main event, and you will forever remember it until you die.

Don't F it up! You will have more regret than you even know is humanely possible!

I will leave it at this. Most Marines have had someone from the Army, Navy, or Air Force come up to us and say "you know, I was going to join the Marine Corps... But"

I know Legionnaires hear the same.

Aspirants, be a man, honor your commitment. Military service is not FOR ALL; however, your word is and if you pledge to do so, honor your contract and the Legionnaires that have lead the way since the 1800s. It takes a special breed to be a Legionnaire. You have it in you, you have to choose to want it, work at it, and succeed. Because, if you do not learn the values life is going to chew you up and shit you out for sure.

Semper Fidelis
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#2
(...) How much time do you aspirants think it takes to get all of those outstanding legionnaires to look perfect in uniform, to march down the Champs-Élysées avenue, and to hear the roaring expression of the crowd "Vive la Légion étrangère!" You are the main event, and you will forever remember it until you die.

Don't F it up! You will have more regret than you even know is humanely possible!

I will leave it at this. Most Marines have had someone from the Army, Navy, or Air Force come up to us and say "you know, I was going to join the Marine Corps... But"

I know Legionnaires hear the same.
Thanks USMCRET, well summed up. As for the main event and forever remembered I've got une petite anecdote (a little story):
It was in the days when the Legion music was MPLE Musique Principale de La Légion étrangère. I'm not really sure what the difference is between today's MLE apart from the number of bandsmen. To make up the numbers some, a very few, could hardly play an instrument, but would just carry the instrument. One of these was Jock Devine. He carried the Oboe (I think that's what it's called - the big brass instrument at the back). They were playing at an international football match, France versus someone, Spain I think. Jock had gotten a hold of some fire water from somewhere and was... drunk.
When the Music had finished they marched off the football pitch and right wheeled, Jock who was in the rear rank and extreme right, left wheeled. Being an international game there were TV cameras everywhere. Jock had his fifteen minutes of celebrity and 20 days in jail to enjoy it. Needless to say he never lived it down.
As for regretting not joining or completing your 5 years, you will all your life. I've said this before, I spent my last 11 months in the museum. A great job, you have access to all the Legion documents and archives. Plus there are store rooms containing all sorts of items that once belonged to famous legionnaires. In my day they put in Cchs with 15 years or more in case a visitor should ask a question. There were three of us and we would take it in turn to do a week of permanence, this meant being dressed in tenue de sortie and working behind the souvenir counter.
On weekends, especially in summer, there would be great hordes of visitors and I lost count of the number of times people would tell me how much they regretted not having joined. Or telling me that they always wanted to join but never found the time.

The more curious would ask me how long I had been in, I'd say 17 years. “Really what was it like?â€￾ As if I could (or even wanted to) condense 17 years of Legion life into 5 minutes. I quickly avoided saying “it was toughâ€￾, because then I would have a crowd of people all waiting to hear tales of brutality and punishments such as being buried in the sand up to you neck in the blazing heat of the desert.

The ideal position for the Night Jumper?
 
#3
Isn't it night crawler?!

I don't believe you Joseph. A guy like you doesn't get into trouble. I can't see it... Cosgrove buried to his neck in sand while his head burns in the sun. All the while breathing in that dust, that glorious dust that finds it's way into every god damn thing. Do they at least give you a pair of sun glasses and take a picture?? Like a day at the beach?

Brass section?... I think it goes coronet, trumpet, french horn, trombone, baritone, tuba. Maybe baritone?...
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#4
Isn't it night crawler?!

I don't believe you Joseph. A guy like you doesn't get into trouble. I can't see it... Cosgrove buried to his neck in sand while his head burns in the sun. All the while breathing in that dust, that glorious dust that finds it's way into every god damn thing. Do they at least give you a pair of sun glasses and take a picture?? Like a day at the beach?

Brass section?... I think it goes coronet, trumpet, french horn, trombone, baritone, tuba. Maybe baritone?...
http://image-parcours.copainsdavant.com/image/750/1837380693/2721062.jpg
that's the guys I mean on the far right of the photo. I wasn't buried up to my neck in sand but that is what the visitors wanted to hear, I certainly didn't say that.
I did do a 30 day stint in jail in Castel and a 10 day then a 7 day in Guiana. Got away with it in 5 RE and again in Aubagne. Going to jail (with the right motives) does not affect your legion career in the slightest. It's no fun, but there is a lot of false bravado when you get out, 'piece of piss' and so on. But having been twice garde punis, once in the REP and once in 5 RE I can tell you that it's no fun.

As for the Night Jumper, he was someone who was on here and conned everyone, for a while, into believing he was in the legion and that he did the night combat jump in Mali. He has since been banned.
 
#5
Hahaha... Chas thought I was the 'night jumper' reborn. Believe me, I was paying attention. If you didn't earn it with blood, sweat or tears, you've got nothing sweet heart!

Second, great photo! Pretty sure that's a tuba off to the right. Remember Arnold Schwarzenegger says- it's not a tuba... Hehehe

Third, of course I remembered you saying that you had a stint as a guarde punis in 2Rep. You are just such a 'straight shooter' I don't see you in any kind of trouble. As for being buried, I saw that show Ed "Bear" Grillys did (Escape to the Legion, was that really Raider Dingo?) and I saw that movie with Tom Hardy (not one of his best movies IMHO, Deserter, does better in Guy Richie movies). Do they really still bury a guy that messed up? Funny how the harsh landscape brings out harsh personalities...

That is all...
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#6
Hahaha... Chas thought I was the 'night jumper' reborn. Believe me, I was paying attention. If you didn't earn it with blood, sweat or tears, you've got nothing sweet heart!

Second, great photo! Pretty sure that's a tuba off to the right. Remember Arnold Schwarzenegger says- it's not a tuba... Hehehe

Third, of course I remembered you saying that you had a stint as a guarde punis in 2Rep. You are just such a 'straight shooter' I don't see you in any kind of trouble. As for being buried, I saw that show Ed "Bear" Grillys did (Escape to the Legion, was that really Raider Dingo?) and I saw that movie with Tom Hardy (not one of his best movies IMHO, Deserter, does better in Guy Richie movies). Do they really still bury a guy that messed up? Funny how the harsh landscape brings out harsh personalities...

That is all...
Atrox, garde punis is a prison warden who looks after the prisoners. I think this burying people is a myth, I never saw it happen in my day, maybe Voltigeur can give us an insight to his time in Algeria.
 

voltigeur

Legionnaire
Former Moderator
#7
Atrox, garde punis is a prison warden who looks after the prisoners. I think this burying people is a myth, I never saw it happen in my day, maybe Voltigeur can give us an insight to his time in Algeria.
No, I never heard or saw anything like it. However, the backpack with stones, attached with electrical wires instead of leather straps was still used for serious offences such as desertion or subordination. (witnessed that myself)
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#8
No, I never heard or saw anything like it. However, the backpack with stones, attached with electrical wires instead of leather straps was still used for serious offences such as desertion or subordination. (witnessed that myself)

I only saw this in the Simon Murray Movie, you guys know for sure. There is so much Military Lore out there and it is full of Crap. I always loved it when you'd hear someone I struck or beat up an Officer. What a load of Crap in almost all incidences. Once in Boot Camp one of the Guys in my platoon decided he was going to challenge a Drill Instructor, wrong answer, the DIs rained down on him mercilessly.
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#9
Thanks USMCRET, well summed up. As for the main event and forever remembered I've got une petite anecdote (a little story):
It was in the days when the Legion music was MPLE Musique Principale de La Légion étrangère. I'm not really sure what the difference is between today's MLE apart from the number of bandsmen. To make up the numbers some, a very few, could hardly play an instrument, but would just carry the instrument. One of these was Jock Devine. He carried the Oboe (I think that's what it's called - the big brass instrument at the back). They were playing at an international football match, France versus someone, Spain I think. Jock had gotten a hold of some fire water from somewhere and was... drunk.
When the Music had finished they marched off the football pitch and right wheeled, Jock who was in the rear rank and extreme right, left wheeled. Being an international game there were TV cameras everywhere. Jock had his fifteen minutes of celebrity and 20 days in jail to enjoy it. Needless to say he never lived it down.
As for regretting not joining or completing your 5 years, you will all your life. I've said this before, I spent my last 11 months in the museum. A great job, you have access to all the Legion documents and archives. Plus there are store rooms containing all sorts of items that once belonged to famous legionnaires. In my day they put in Cchs with 15 years or more in case a visitor should ask a question. There were three of us and we would take it in turn to do a week of permanence, this meant being dressed in tenue de sortie and working behind the souvenir counter.
On weekends, especially in summer, there would be great hordes of visitors and I lost count of the number of times people would tell me how much they regretted not having joined. Or telling me that they always wanted to join but never found the time.

The more curious would ask me how long I had been in, I'd say 17 years. “Really what was it like?â€￾ As if I could (or even wanted to) condense 17 years of Legion life into 5 minutes. I quickly avoided saying “it was toughâ€￾, because then I would have a crowd of people all waiting to hear tales of brutality and punishments such as being buried in the sand up to you neck in the blazing heat of the desert.

The ideal position for the Night Jumper?
Many times Joe, people will say thank you for your services and really all you can say, or at least for me, I'd say you are welcome; however, thank you, it was the greatest honor and privilege of my life to serve as a Marine.
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#10
Instead of a Company or Battalion Brig, the Marines that as you guys like to say did a Banane, they would end up being on 45-days Restriction to the Barracks (House Arrest) and 45-days Extra Duties (scrubbing shitters). And if you asked anyone of the knuckle heads who did the 45/45, they would have wanted to be in the Brig.
 

voltigeur

Legionnaire
Former Moderator
#11
I only saw this in the Simon Murray Movie, you guys know for sure. There is so much Military Lore out there and it is full of Crap. I always loved it when you'd hear someone I struck or beat up an Officer. What a load of Crap in almost all incidences. Once in Boot Camp one of the Guys in my platoon decided he was going to challenge a Drill Instructor, wrong answer, the DIs rained down on him mercilessly.
One of my platoon mates hit a lieutenant during a roll call. He was taken immediately into custody and sentenced six months (with elastic) to Company Discipline. Check with search for post about CD.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#12
I only saw this in the Simon Murray Movie, you guys know for sure. There is so much Military Lore out there and it is full of Crap. I always loved it when you'd hear someone I struck or beat up an Officer. What a load of Crap in almost all incidences. Once in Boot Camp one of the Guys in my platoon decided he was going to challenge a Drill Instructor, wrong answer, the DIs rained down on him mercilessly.
USMCRET, the film was an embarrassment to the legion and himself, the worse thing was he produced it. The book is much better but as it was from a different era, I can't really comment further than saying it made for good reading. Did you know he paid for a part of the legion music to go to Hong Kong for a private do?
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#13
USMCRET, the film was an embarrassment to the legion and himself, the worse thing was he produced it. The book is much better but as it was from a different era, I can't really comment further than saying it made for good reading. Did you know he paid for a part of the legion music to go to Hong Kong for a private do?
No I did not know he put up that kind of money. I am sure you Legionnaires look at these movies like we do and say "damn, did you even bother talking to any military veterans?"
 

voltigeur

Legionnaire
Former Moderator
#16
No I did not know he put up that kind of money. I am sure you Legionnaires look at these movies like we do and say "damn, did you even bother talking to any military veterans?"
Actually, Simon was a veteran from the Legion. I did see the movie, but the only thing that stuck out was when the prisoner led them to an ambush. It was a know tactic by suicidal prisoners.
BTW, his matricule was 3.5 k higher than mine.;)
 

voltigeur

Legionnaire
Former Moderator
#18
And if I may be so bold, having read official rapports, the time served was not deducted from your legion service.
No, it had to be served extra, however that might have changed after the Legion left Algeria. I believe it was anything more that the standard eight days was added on to your contract.
 

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