The Siege of Jadotville

Highlander

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There is a new movie in Netflix (original netflix) about The siege of Jadotville by the UN peacekeepers.
They mencioned ex-legionnaires working as mercenaries and a special name as their commander: Rene Faulques ( or Roger Faulques)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3922798
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHNtzyXvyLc

Anyone saw this movie? I saw that the movie display "Faulques" wearing a 2rep insignia with a red beret.
The movie show some tiny piece of history, so they dont proper explain everything...
 

SLehman

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I watched it yesterday on Netflix. It's a great film and well worth the time to watch. Very much respect is deserved by the defending Irish company. It's a shame they weren't recognized earlier for this action, 45 years was a crime.

It raises an interesting debate on former soldiers serving as mercenaries that are engaged against like minded nations.
 
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Ossie O

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There is a new movie in Netflix (original netflix) about The siege of Jadotville by the UN peacekeepers.
They mencioned ex-legionnaires working as mercenaries and a special name as their commander: Rene Faulques ( or Roger Faulques)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3922798
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHNtzyXvyLc

Anyone saw this movie? I saw that the movie display "Faulques" wearing a 2rep insignia with a red beret.
The movie show some tiny piece of history, so they dont proper explain everything...
Roger Faulques is a legend (grand soldat) of 1/2REP. I had the privilege of meeting him in Calvi many years ago. These outstanding men would often appear without notice at Camp Raffalli...R.I.P Ancien
 
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Highlander

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Roger Faulques is a legend (grand soldat) of 1/2REP. I had the privilege of meeting him in Calvi many years ago. These outstanding men would often appear without notice at Camp Raffalli...R.I.P Ancien
That`s amazing Ossie O, really. Do you know anything about him after the legion?
 

Fin109

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I saw it on Netflix but figured it was crap and passed it.
I'll have to watch it. Thanks for posting.
 
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Ossie O

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That`s amazing Ossie O, really. Do you know anything about him after the legion?
You can google that yourself. Commandant Faulques was active within the Legion community right up till his death in Nov 2011. He had the honour of carrying Captain Danjou's hand at the 2010 Camerone parade in Aubagne (image provided).

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SLehman

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You can google that yourself. Commandant Faulques was active within the Legion community right up till his death in Nov 2011. He had the honour of carrying the hand of Danjou at the Camerone 2010 parade in Aubagne (image provided). I feel so fortunate that I had the opportunity to meet these wonderful men who fought in Indochina and Algeria.
Had to be quite an honour to be elected to carry the hand of Captain Danjou, thank you for sharing the photo.
 

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I watched this film for two reasons.....1) I like war films and 2)....I think Jamie Dornan is pretty hot ha ;-) well I'm female! We like hot guys!. Ok seriously....I know the film was based on true events but I wasn't glued to the screen, as I normally would be....don't think I even blinked while watching American Sniper! So to me the film was okish, but that is just a mere females opinion....

Bags :)
 

Finleythefox

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Not the bad guys, there is a former legionnaire or two that became mercs and were paid to attack or take the location that the Irish (UN) were holding. I guess he was also a pretty famous legionnaire. Good movie.
 

jonny

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That`s amazing Ossie O, really. Do you know anything about him after the legion?
Hi again,

I served under Faulques in Algeria in the 1950s. He and Cabiro were both Commandants (Majors) under Lt-Col Darmuzai, with Cabiro the most senior of the two. They were both Indochina and Dien Bien Phu veterans. I had the experience of watching them at close quarters during the Gen Challe's “Steamrollerâ€￾ operation when I served in the regimental command unit.
They were both very impressive and totally professional officers, and they were both highly respected by the troops. We would have followed them to hell and back. Cabiro and Faulques were in charge of 2 REP during the 1961 putsch against De Gaulle, in which I also most enthusiastically participated, but alas, never got a mention in the history books.
I know a bit mote about the career of Roger Faulques after the putsch, if anybody is interested.
 

jwaltos

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Zgn bt.
 
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Nickfury

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Hi again,

I served under Faulques in Algeria in the 1950s. He and Cabiro were both Commandants (majors) under Lt Col Darmuzai, with Cabiro the most senior of the two. They were both Indochina, and Dien Bien Phu veterans. I had the experience of watching them at close quarters during the "Challe Steamroller" operation when I served in the regimental command unit.

They were both very impressive and totally professional officers, and they were both highly respected by the troops. We would have followed them to hell and back. Cabiro and Faulques were in charge of 2 REP during the 1961 Putch against de Gaulle, in which I also most enthusiastically participated, but alas, never got a mention in the history books.



I know a bit mote about the career of Roger Faulques after the putch, if anybody is interested.
Share with all of us if you would be so kind.
 

jonny

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Share with all of us if you would be so kind.
Nickfury et al,

Here's Jonny!! I'll get back on that movie and Cdt Faulques, however I have just watched the movie to see what it's about, and I have the following quick comments:

One. Faulques did not look anything like the character in the movie, neither can I imagine him ever behave like it.

Two. The French and Belgians and anybody from their former colonies militaries wear their beret badge on the right, where it's supposed to be. Not on the left, as in this movie (of course the Irish got that bit wrong).

Three. Most of the weapons in the movie never existed in early 1960s

Four. It's too biased, all about the brave Irish (who I'm sure are braver than most, just to fend off expected attacks).

Cheers,
Jonny
 

dusaboss

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If you lock for movie to be accurate depiction of reality you will be disappointed. Also you will be disappointed if movie is made to real. Movie is art. As such in it can't be portrait 100% copy-paste reality even if it based on real events.

Documentaries are closer to reality and even there movie makers insert little drama and artistic freedoms.

Anyway they have to do homework and not make stupid errors like putting weapons from another era in movie or some similar obvious mistake.

I will watch movie tonight so I can comment on.
 

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Some historical corrections:

(...) They were both Indochina and Dien Bien Phu veterans. (...)
CPT Bernard Cabiro, CO of 4e Cie, 1er BEP, was seriously wounded a few days before the ‘real start’ of the battle of Ä￾iện Biên Phủ (Mar 13, 1954), during the attack on hill 781, located a few kms NE of the position. He was replaced by his 2IC, 1LT André Bertrand (KIA Mar 22, 1954), and evacuated to Hanoi and then to France. He did not participate in the battle itself.
1LT Roger Faulques was one of the few officers of 1er BEP (along with CPT Jeanpierre, who would later become, as an LTC, CO of 1er REP in Algeria) who survived the disaster of the Cao Bằng evacuation along the RC4 (Colonial Route #4) in Sept/Oct 1950. He was so badly wounded that the Vietminh believed he would not survive and accepted to put his name among those who were medevaced from That Khe, after the battle. Faulques however was no longer in Indochina during the battle of DBP.


(...) Cabiro and Faulques were in charge of 2 REP during the 1961 putsch against De Gaulle (...)
Faulques was no longer in Algeria during the Apr 1961 putsch. He was officially put on a leave of absence from the French Army (mis en disponibilité) and went to Congo as a mercenary, covertly working for the French government who was interested in gaining a foothold in the former Belgian colony, after its independence. He also later worked for the MI6 in Yemen.
MAJ Cabiro on the other hand, as mentioned by Jonny, did participate in the putsch. He took over from 2e REP CO, LTC Darmuzai, who said he was opposed to the putsch. In practice though, the putsch didn't last long enough for the 2e REP to take any real part in it.
 
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Highlander

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Thank you, Jonny and Rapace. Just sad most people won't know about the kind of person he was, and I will only know him for a biased movie.
 

jonny

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Some historical corrections:

CPT Bernard Cabiro, CO of 4e Cie, 1er BEP, was seriously wounded a few days before the ‘real start’ of the battle of Ä￾iện Biên Phủ (Mar 13, 1954), during the attack on hill 781, located a few kms NE of the position. He was replaced by his 2IC, 1LT André Bertrand (KIA Mar 22, 1954), and evacuated to Hanoi and then to France. He did not participate in the battle itself.
1LT Roger Faulques was one of the few officers of 1er BEP (along with CPT Jeanpierre, who would later become, as an LTC, CO of 1er REP in Algeria) who survived the disaster of the Cao Bằng evacuation along the RC4 (Colonial Route #4) in Sept/Oct 1950. He was so badly wounded that the Vietminh believed he would not survive and accepted to put his name among those who were medevaced from That Khe, after the battle. Faulques however was no longer in Indochina during the battle of DBP.


Faulques was no longer in Algeria during the Apr 1961 putsch. He was officially put on a leave of absence from the French Army (mis en disponibilité) and went to Congo as a mercenary, covertly working for the French government who was interested in gaining a foothold in the former Belgian colony, after its independence. He also later worked for the MI6 in Yemen.
MAJ Cabiro on the other hand, as mentioned by Jonny, did participate in the putsch. He took over from 2e REP CO, LTC Darmuzai, who said he was opposed to the putsch. In practice though, the putsch didn't last long enough for the 2e REP to take any real part in it.
Thank you Rapace, my post was from a 55 year old memory bank only. Yes, I was in fact wondering a bit how I remembered “Le Cab'â€￾ from the putsch, and not Faulques.

And, yes, I was also counting on you to correct any mistake I would inadvertently make on Faulques' CV. And you are also right of his connections to British Intelligence Service and Yemen as well. Perhaps a real life James Bond?
Anyway, I'm happy to have known him and served under his command in Algeria.
 

jonny

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And as an aside, when I returned to Marseille in June 1962, after five years in Algeria, I was still barely 22 years old and wondering what to do next. I spoke several languages very well, but only knew soldiering and sailor work as professions. I also only had the minimum of 7 years of school education.

At the time, both the OAS in Algeria and the Belgian Congo mercenary options were open, and I gave hem some serious considerations, as well as the Spanish foreign legion. But in the end I just chose the easy option of going back to sea.

And why not just stay in the French Foreign Legion then?

Well, I was briefly considering the Madagascar battalion, or even the Sahara companies,
but in the end I knew the Algerian life of the Legion was all over and finished with. Something new would probably emerge that would be another kind of Legion to the one I had known. And yes, a bit boring as well, after Algeria.

I knew all the assholes would come out of the woodworks to impress on new subordinates how bloody tough they were, and how otherwise sane NCOs would become the same.

OK, that was my opinion back in 1962, and I was probably all wrong. I'm sure the Legion of today is a fine instrument of military valour and an example to all lesser military units.
 

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It's clear that the end of the Algeria war was a major change in the Legion's life after 131 years of uninterrupted campaigns, since their creation. If you look into YouTube you'll find an old documentary, shot I think in 1964, titled “La Légion sans baroudâ€￾ where you can see seasoned legionnaires expressing some concerns over the future of the Legion. That was perfectly legitimate.
But 53 years later, the Legion is still there, still attracting young (or not so young) men from all over the world and still proudly serving France wherever it's needed: Chad from the late 60s till today, Kolwezi and many other places in Africa (CAR, Rwanda, Somalia,...), Lebanon, Ex-Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Mali, etc. Different from what it was in the early 60s, for sure, the same way it was very different in the 60s from what it was in WW1.
 

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