Salle d'honneur Calvi

Rapace

Moderator
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
Messages
5,719
Reaction score
898
Location
France
Best answers
0
Home Country
France
Correct. Before the introduction of the MAT 49, the standard issue, PM MAS 38, had become obsolete and many airborne battalions were equipped with MP40s, taken from the German stocks left in France after the end of WW2.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
4,628
Reaction score
2,895
Location
Hua Hin Thailand
Best answers
1
Home Country
New Zealand
MP40, I'm sure the use of German equipment was extremely prevalent, massive stockpiles to rearm certain units until a standard can be reached. The French military was a soup of equipment up until the late 50's
Not forgetting that the Legion ranks were teeming with Germans after WWII.
 
OP
Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd

New Member
Legionnaire
Joined
Nov 2, 2017
Messages
231
Reaction score
644
Location
Australia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Australia
As you’ve mentioned Roger Faulques, he gave to the salle d’honneur the battle dress jacket he was wearing during the operation of the evacuation of Cao Bang along the RC4, in September-October 1950. The operation turned into a disaster where 1er BEP was annihilated. Faulques was severely wounded and captured by the Viets. Convinced that he wouldn’t survive they allowed his medevac back to Hanoi.
One could still see the holes in the jacket caused by the bullets/schrapnel that hit him.
Below the uniform (US origin) worn by paras units in 1950 in Indochina.


View attachment 4422
1BEP parachuted just south/east of That Khe on the 18 September 1950. Massively outnumbered, over the next weeks they failed to fight their way up to Dong Khe.
 

Attachments

Surfguy

Super Active Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
1,162
Reaction score
319
Location
Wales Mostly
Best answers
0
Home Country
United Kingdom
From Wiki

"Post-war usage
During and after the end of World War II, many MP 40s were captured or surrendered (upwards of 200,000) to the Allies and were then redistributed to the paramilitary and irregular forces of some developing countries.[18] The Norwegian army withdrew the MP 38 from use in 1975 but used the MP 40 for some years more. In particular, the Territorials (Heimevernet) used it until about 1990, when it was replaced by the Heckler & Koch MP5."
 

mark wake

Legionnaire
Premium Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2013
Messages
900
Reaction score
561
Location
connecticut
Best answers
0
Home Country
United States
2REP museum...photos from my time working on the extension "late 1993. I enjoyed it immensely. The legendary Roger Faulques and other 1REP veterans payed us a visit to ask about the work when they were in Calvi. By the way, the Régimental colours/drapeu is kept in the museum. The photo of the table is where you present yourself to the Chef de Corps on the morning of guard 24.
Changed a bit since I was there! Good pics mate.
 
OP
Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd

New Member
Legionnaire
Joined
Nov 2, 2017
Messages
231
Reaction score
644
Location
Australia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Australia
Front/rear view of the monument at Calvi (originally on the parade ground of 3BEP/3REP Algeria). The legendary Roger Faulques is second from left in the bottom photo "taken in 2010.The same year he carried the hand of Cpt. Danjou at Aubagne on Camerone Day. The man was largely responsible for all those Irish U.N troops not being skinned and cooked alive in the Congo during the siege of Jadotville 1961.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

SnafuSmite

Active Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2015
Messages
1,360
Reaction score
877
Location
South of South
Best answers
1
Home Country
South Africa
Front/rear view of the monument at Calvi (originally on the parade ground of 3BEP/3REP Algeria). The legendary Roger Faulques is second from left in the bottom photo "taken in 2010.The same year he carried the hand of Cpt. Danjou at Aubagne on Camerone Day. The man was largely responsible for all those Irish U.N troops not being skinned and cooked alive in the Congo during the siege of Jadotville 1961.
There's a movie out recently, based on the siege. Its called "The Siege of Jadotville," not sure on the historical accuracy of the film, but I thought it was pretty good.
 

Perun

Super Active Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
Messages
1,006
Reaction score
115
Location
Zagreb
Best answers
0
Home Country
Croatia
I thought so as well, it's a good watch. Historic accuracy , always depend on who you ask especially these days.
 

mark wake

Legionnaire
Premium Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2013
Messages
900
Reaction score
561
Location
connecticut
Best answers
0
Home Country
United States
There's a movie out recently, based on the siege. Its called "The Siege of Jadotville," not sure on the historical accuracy of the film, but I thought it was pretty good.
Not bad as far as accuracy is concerned a few blunders but no movie is perfect! For me it was good to see some familiar weapons! the immortal .50 cal browning. the FAL 7.62 fn ( known as the SLR in Brit slang. memories of northern island!) and my favorite the MAT-49 all familier with the Congo!
 
OP
Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd

New Member
Legionnaire
Joined
Nov 2, 2017
Messages
231
Reaction score
644
Location
Australia
Best answers
0
Home Country
Australia
Loved shooting the 50 Cal (widow maker)...a nice work-out if you were in the gun crew. Learnt my marksmanship principles with a SLR 7.62 calibre in the Australian army in the early 1980's. The only drawback and personal gripe was that the barrel was way too long on the SLR. During jungle training, also inside helicopters crammed with men and equipment, it was a damn hinderence (and at times dangerous). No wonder the Oz SAS cut down the barrels in Vietnam.
 
Last edited:

SnafuSmite

Active Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2015
Messages
1,360
Reaction score
877
Location
South of South
Best answers
1
Home Country
South Africa
Loved shooting the 50 Cal (widow maker)...a nice work-out if you were in the gun crew. Learnt my marksmanship principles with a SLR 7.62 calibre in the Australian army in the early 1980's. The only drawback and personal gripe was that the barrel was way too long on the SLR. During jungle training, also inside helicopters crammed with men and equipment, it was a damn hinderence (and at times dangerous). No wonder the Oz SAS cut down the barrels in Vietnam.
Theres a Para version of the FAL, in South Africa we also had a variant called the R2, the R2 had a folding stock and full length barrel.
images.jpeg
FAL para
images (1).jpeg
R2 rifle
 
Joined
Mar 23, 2018
Messages
4,008
Reaction score
1,579
Location
UK
Best answers
0
Home Country
United Kingdom
Loved shooting the 50 Cal (widow maker)...a nice work-out if you were in the gun crew. Learnt my marksmanship principles with a SLR 7.62 calibre in the Australian army in the early 1980's. The only drawback and personal gripe was that the barrel was way too long on the SLR. During jungle training, also inside helicopters crammed with men and equipment, it was a damn hinderence (and at times dangerous). No wonder the Oz SAS cut down the barrels in Vietnam.
Yeah pain in the Ass..got cought in Cam nets ..everything too. Was glad my personal weapon was an SMG, was easier Jumping in & out vehicles .
Mind you was a pea Shooter.
 
Last edited:

mark wake

Legionnaire
Premium Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2013
Messages
900
Reaction score
561
Location
connecticut
Best answers
0
Home Country
United States
Loved shooting the 50 Cal (widow maker)...a nice work-out if you were in the gun crew. Learnt my marksmanship principles with a SLR 7.62 calibre in the Australian army in the early 1980's. The only drawback and personal gripe was that the barrel was way too long on the SLR. During jungle training, also inside helicopters crammed with men and equipment, it was a damn hinderence (and at times dangerous). No wonder the Oz SAS cut down the barrels in Vietnam.
Agree mate. When i was with the Brit army it was also tried in the sniper role but without much success. We ended up going back to the the good old .303 lee enfield modified for the sniper role. anyway back to the Congo in 78 when we dropped in to say hello to the Katanga 😆 a lot of the lads much preferred the FAl 7.62 over the MAS-49/56 cheers mate.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2006
Messages
3,542
Reaction score
1,135
Location
U.K.
Best answers
0
Home Country
United Kingdom
I was weaned on the Lee Enfield 303 Mk 4. I loved it and was a marksman. Also the ghastly Sten which was very prone to accidental discharge, mass produced and cheap as chips. WW2 relics. Then we received the Sterling SMG much to our delight. Also we had the superb Bren LMG 303. Finally the SLR became our weapon of choice. Subsequently the original SA 80s' were crap. Fortunately they were not issued in my time.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2006
Messages
3,542
Reaction score
1,135
Location
U.K.
Best answers
0
Home Country
United Kingdom
Sterling- controlled burst of 3 rounds. Aim left lower stomach and the rounds will stitch diagonally across left to right. The weapon produced shots that jumped high L to R.

I was not the slightest bit impressed with the U tube film albeit the weapon appears to be in pristine condition. Firing like that would and you would be the recipient of a major bollocking. I presume it is for advertising.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 23, 2018
Messages
4,008
Reaction score
1,579
Location
UK
Best answers
0
Home Country
United Kingdom
Sterling- controlled burst of 3 rounds. Aim left lower stomach and the rounds will stitch diagonally across left to right. The weapon produced shots that jumped high L to R.

I was not the slightest bit impressed with the U tube film albeit the weapon appears to be in pristine condition. Firing like that would and you would be the recipient of a major bollocking. I presume it is for advertising.
I played with big Guns chas...the God of war. Napoleon & Stalin said this...
 
Joined
Mar 23, 2018
Messages
4,008
Reaction score
1,579
Location
UK
Best answers
0
Home Country
United Kingdom
was cleaning out my basement..look what i found...haha, needs a clean. notice i still have old MFO Boxes...LOL
45484549
 

Most viewed threads of the week

Top