New Norwegian book

#4
I pre-ordered this book, and got it in the mail this morning. I just finished reading it (290 pages) and wow, what a fantastic book.

The thing i really liked about it was that it was not about how tough the legion is - it was more personal stories from Norwegian legionnaires from the 1800´s until 2015.

It was very interesting to see member(s) from this forum writing personal stories in the book!
 
#5
I pre-ordered this book, and got it in the mail this morning. I just finished reading it (290 pages) and wow, what a fantastic book.

The thing i really liked about it was that it was not about how tough the legion is - it was more personal stories from Norwegian legionnaires from the 1800´s until 2015.

It was very interesting to see member(s) from this forum writing personal stories in the book!
So is Johnny in the book? :D
 
#7
So is Johnny in the book? :D
Well, there is a Norwegian named Johnny mentioned in the book, and he problaly was in the legion in the late 50´s and early 60´s in Algeria. However, his name first name in the book is Johnny, and the guy we all hope are mentioned in the book writes his (at least nickname) as Jonny, without H. The story of Johnny in the book doesnt correspond with the stories Jonny has put up in the forum, so im not sure if "our" Jonny is mentioned in the book, unfortunately.

To be honest i dont even know the real name of our Jonny, but the book mentions a last name for the guy Johnny.

I recommend the book, and hey you are Danish, then i suppose you can read it :D
 
#8
Well, there is a Norwegian named Johnny mentioned in the book, and he problaly was in the legion in the late 50´s and early 60´s in Algeria. However, his name first name in the book is Johnny, and the guy we all hope are mentioned in the book writes his (at least nickname) as Jonny, without H. The story of Johnny in the book doesnt correspond with the stories Jonny has put up in the forum, so im not sure if "our" Jonny is mentioned in the book, unfortunately.

To be honest i dont even know the real name of our Jonny, but the book mentions a last name for the guy Johnny.

I recommend the book, and hey you are Danish, then i suppose you can read it :D
Yeah I might just read it :D
Our Jonny/Johnny (I think it was without the H) also served in Algeria in the 50's-60's so it could be him. He mentioned his 'legion name' once but I can't exactly remember it.
 
#9
Yes he did according to his bio. It would be great if Jonny could reply to this thread to confirm or debunk that he is the guy mentioned in the book :)
And by the way - looks like he havent been logged in for over a month. Hope everything is okay with him.

Btw i found his name (or current name) and it is not the same name as mentioned in the book.
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
#10
So what we know about our Johnny? I know that he after he left the ship in Algeria some serving legionar advise him that he better get the hell out of there. Johnny, of course, listened that guy. :) He was about 17 y old.

So what we also know about him so can compare by events described in book Countdown ?

I know what some anciens think about this. "STFU ! Maybe he want to stay anonymous!" Really? Please. If that is case I guess you are stacked in 80s. He close to 80 y old. I don't think his priority is to stay anonymous.

And if someone want to do that. Please don't use public forum are even internet at all. There's no anonymity on internet! And I respect Jonny, It would be best that he give us some note and spare us from trouble
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#11
Here's some of Johnny's bio from Paul De Pierres book 'A moi la Legion' Australians in the French Foreign Legion. I believe Johnny lives somewhere in Australia now.
According to THE Jonny, yes he is now living in Australia. I'd nicknamed him the silly Norweigian for good reason. He PMd 5 times in a row hailing me with abuse. No big deal, but when he used to put down todays legionnaires, that used to really wind me up.
 
#12
Here's some of Johnny's bio from Paul De Pierres book 'A moi la Legion' Australians in the French Foreign Legion. I believe Johnny lives somewhere in Australia now.
Thanks Ossie. Is there more about Jonny (Jan) in the book? Looks like it, would be great if you could post it :)

This is what the book mentions about the Norwegian Johnny who serves in the legion in the late 50´s and 60´s:

Johnny joined the legion at age 18 in the city of Lille (our Jonny joined in Algeria or something, didnt he?) He was working as a sailor, just like our Jonny and like most Norwegians joining the legion at that time.

Already during the recruit period he started to regret his decision to join.The food was bad and the dicipline hard. After the recruit period he went to Ain Sefra where he saw battle multiple times.

Johnny tried to desert, but got caught. Another Norwegian serving with Johnny tells that Johnny was displayed in front of the rest of the legionnaires. Johnny was shame cut (is that a word? they cut his hair in a amusing way) and beaten before he was displayed to the legionnaires, as a warning for what will happen to other deserters.

Johnny deserted again, and this was succesful. He deserted with his rifle, ammunition and hand grenades. However, he got caught by rebels. Luckily, the rebel doctor had been in Norway during his studies and the rebels helped Johnny go to Spanish Morocco, where he was jailed before being transfered to Spain, where the Norwegian consul helped him out of prison and got him sent back to Norway.

This story is quite a different one from our Jonnys story, and the name from the picture Ossie attached is neither the same. I dont believe they are the same persons.
 
#13
Here's some of Johnny's bio from Paul De Pierres book 'A moi la Legion' Australians in the French Foreign Legion. I believe Johnny lives somewhere in Australia now.
Thanks Ossie. Is there more about Jonny (Jan) in the book? Looks like it, would be great if you could post it :)

This is what the book mentions about the Norwegian Johnny who serves in the legion in the late 50´s and 60´s:

Johnny joined the legion at age 18 in the city of Lille (our Jonny joined in Algeria or something, didnt he?) He was working as a sailor, just like our Jonny and like most Norwegians joining the legion at that time.

Already during the recruit period he started to regret his decision to join.The food was bad and the dicipline hard. After the recruit period he went to Ain Sefra where he saw battle multiple times.

Johnny tried to desert, but got caught. Another Norwegian serving with Johnny tells that Johnny was displayed in front of the rest of the legionnaires. Johnny was shame cut (is that a word? they cut his hair in a amusing way) and beaten before he was displayed to the legionnaires, as a warning for what will happen to other deserters.

Johnny deserted again, and this was succesful. He deserted with his rifle, ammunition and hand grenades. However, he got caught by rebels. Luckily, the rebel doctor had been in Norway during his studies and the rebels helped Johnny go to Spanish Morocco, where he was jailed before being transfered to Spain, where the Norwegian consul helped him out of prison and got him sent back to Norway.

This story is quite a different one from our Jonnys story, and the name from the picture Ossie attached is neither the same. I dont believe they are the same persons.
 

Peter Lyderik

Hyper Active Member
#14
@ Countdown

Is Jøn or Olav Jøntvedt in the book? How many Norwegians and from when, which periods? Is the book based on interviews, biographies, what? Some more details, please.

Thanks :)
 
#15
Here's some of Johnny's bio from Paul De Pierres book 'A moi la Legion' Australians in the French Foreign Legion. I believe Johnny lives somewhere in Australia now.
Thanks Ossie. Is there more about Jonny (Jan) in the book? Looks like it, would be great if you could post it :)

This is what the book mentions about the Norwegian Johnny who serves in the legion in the late 50´s and 60´s:

Johnny joined the legion at age 18 in the city of Lille (our Jonny joined in Algeria or something, didnt he?) He was working as a sailor, just like our Jonny and like most Norwegians joining the legion at that time. Btw, in the book, the Johnny is not from Oslo like our Jonny/Jan.

Already during the recruit period he started to regret his decision to join.The food was bad and the dicipline hard. After the recruit period he went to Ain Sefra where he saw battle multiple times.

Johnny tried to desert, but got caught. Another Norwegian serving with Johnny tells that Johnny was displayed in front of the rest of the legionnaires. Johnny was shame cut (is that a word? they cut his hair in a amusing way) and beaten before he was displayed to the legionnaires, as a warning for what will happen to other deserters.

Johnny deserted again, and this was succesful. He deserted with his rifle, ammunition and hand grenades. However, he got caught by rebels. Luckily, the rebel doctor had been in Norway during his studies and the rebels helped Johnny go to Spanish Morocco, where he was jailed before being transfered to Spain, where the Norwegian consul helped him out of prison and got him sent back to Norway.

This story is quite a different one from our Jonnys story, and the name from the picture Ossie attached is neither the same. I dont believe they are the same persons.


@Peter,
Olav Jøntvedt is mentioned in the book. Interesting story, first he fought on the eastern front for the Waffen SS, then he entered the FFL fighting in Dien Bien Phu, got some medical problems from getting caught by Viet Minh, then became a illustrator for Kepi Blanc.

As for how many Norwegians mentioned in the book, there is a register in the back of the book with all names mentioned, including people that didnt serve in the FFL. When i counted, i counted about 80-90 persons from the register that i could remember was mentioned as current or former members of the FFL :) The earliest Norwegians mentioned fought in the Crimean war in the 1850`s and Mexico etc in 1860´s, and about every decade since then was covered with Norwegian legionnaires that served during that time :D A 1982 rough estimate stated that troughout the years, between 500 to 1000 Norwegians had served in the FFL. The author speculates that up to today, maybe up to 1000 Norwegians has served. Hard to tell, and just speculation...

Much of the book, especially the stories about the legionnaires that served a loong time ago was based on earlier interviews from magazines and stories from newspapers. Many stories was based on stories the legionnaires had told other family members, then the family told the author.

More modern stories from legionnaires from the 50´s and so on had told their own stories to the author, either orally or by e-mail if i´m right. The great part was the last part, there was very informative chapters where Norwegian legionnaires told about their adventures in the 80´s, 90´s, 2000´s and 2010´s. These chapters where the best, and by far the most informative :)

There was also a register with Norwegians killed/died in service for the FFL. The list is problably not complete, but 16 names was mentioned, the last known Norwegian was dead in 1955, and it looks like the last killed was in 1954.

Hey, im spoiling the whole book..
 

Peter Lyderik

Hyper Active Member
#20
Stoeng told about his 15 years in the Legion on the 12th of October, at the Norwegian Veteran Association's Oslo chapter. It is possible to see it on their Facebook site:https://www.facebook.com/VeteranforbundetSIOPS/

Go down to the 12th of October, there is noise in the beginning, but then it works. Intro in Norwegian and in English, and then it is Stoeng's turn in Norwegian.
 

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