[Question] How long do you usually spend in a regiment?

DCLXVI

Legionnaire
#2
That is not what it seems and I am not sure where you received this information, although it is a good way to extract information.

2.5-3 years is the going rate IF, and a lot depends on the IF. If you are not a total banane (and don't worry, that word does not exist outside of the Legion and the locals will look at you wild eyed and wonder what on earth you are talking about). It depends on your behavior. How much trouble you have been into. What you have to offer the other regiment you ask to go to. What the prospects are.

Most of the time if you have 2 years and are a good boy, you can ask and most likely get. But it is better to ask at 3. Again, many factors will determine this. Also, do you want to be the "New" guy ALL OVER in your section? All that comes with changing, even if you have 3 years, you are still new and the traditional set of new guy rules apply, Still. So think about it. BTW, I know where you live now, seeing as you PMed me. That place is full of problems and has a high crime rate. Stay low man and don't get caught up. What you are doing is a good thing, stay in school.
 
#3
It seems like most people do 2 years and then switch, is this usually how it works or is it just a coincidence?
Not sure there's any firm rule. I've heard of legionnaires spending 90% or more of their career in the same regiment, even some that did more that the 5-year initial contract. I guess if you don't ask to change, you will remain in the same regiment, but that's only a guess. Former legionnaires could comment on this.
For officers, it's different. They are normally rotating every 3-4 years to another Legion regiment or even be transferred outside the Legion (and sometimes come back after a while out).


(...) If you are not a total banane (and don't worry, that word does not exist outside of the Legion and the locals will look at you wild eyed and wonder what on earth you are talking about). (...)
The word banane in French does exist outside the Legion and simply means... banana. For some mysterious reasons, in Legion slang, a banane is a blunder or a f*ck up and a bananier (banana tree) is a legionnaire producing a lot of... bananes, voluntarily, or not.
 

DCLXVI

Legionnaire
#4
Rapace,
Yes, of course it exists as a fruit. I guess I didn't clearly make the point. Thanks tho, really. Even me, understanding it as fruit, I am perplexed on how it made its way into the Legion hall of fame for F*CK ups.
 
#5
(...) Even me, understanding it as fruit, I am perplexed on how it made its way into the Legion hall of fame for F*CK ups.
Mysteries of the Legion... Like fumer un cigare (smoking a cigar) meaning receiving a roasting from your superior...
 

DCLXVI

Legionnaire
#6
That one is in fact used often too. I have heard it more used towards a Sgt and higher. Perhaps it is reserved for more “importantâ€￾ elements within our ranks, no idea.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#8
DCLXVI, are you doing your Cpl course before or after your Opex?
I think I can answer for 666, he said he was going after. Now believe it or not this is the best thing that can happen to him. Before you go on these courses you get what is called la note de gueule. Basically this translates to what your superiors think about you. What kind of courses you have done. What missions etc. Vigi and his company courses and then Opex, all mean he's off to a good start.
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#9
I believe 666 is off to a running start and I know sometimes the very straight forward things he reveals about the current state of la Légion is tough to read; however, I recall what all the old timer Marines thought of and what "Their Corps" has come to. Each generation has this opinion, I know, I admit I do. Nov. 3rd, I attended my first Marine Corps Birthday Ball since I retired, 2008 and let me tell you my wife climbed in my A$$ and told me to behave and keep my opinions to myself! Each generations change.

The Marine Corps post Vietnam was a disgrace, the drugs, the attitude, and all of the other distractions seriously laid a very bad reputation on that Post Vietnam generation of Marines. Now, given, there were a good deal of Draftees in the Corps at that time. Two Year Draftees counting down the day they had left to fulfill their draft and military duty. They were pure Shi&.

But the WWII Marines and the Vietnam Marines would have been impressed at this new generation of Marines, as Dusa pointed out see Generation Kill, based on the Battle for Nasiriyah Iraq, 2003. Born again Hard Corps Killers.
 

DCLXVI

Legionnaire
#10
BOARD/FORUM

Believe me, there is far more to me that only select men know and behind the scenes on this forum, and it is need to know, so you know what that means. Joseph is correct, I am going after. It is the best thing for me, too. Because I will have more merits, more experience and possibly do something very noble in the line of duty. It is certainly better for me and will read well upon review and before stage.
USMCRET is correct too. I am all your hard case, or whatever you want me to be to you. But like USMCRET says, sometimes reading my post has most of your dick skinners covering up your tiny cum receptacles. Put 'em down and open your ear balls!
Aside from that, as I said, only a hand full get the pleasure. I don't need to name names. For the rest, keep holding your breath, hell, you are blue here already, your heads are all about to explode.
 

Cernunnos

Active Member
Pro Member
#11
BOARD/FORUM

Believe me, there is far more to me that only select men know and behind the scenes on this forum, and it is need to know, so you know what that means. Joseph is correct, I am going after. It is the best thing for me, too. Because I will have more merits, more experience and possibly do something very noble in the line of duty. It is certainly better for me and will read well upon review and before stage.
USMCRET is correct too. I am all your hard case, or whatever you want me to be to you. But like USMCRET says, sometimes reading my post has most of your dick skinners covering up your tiny cum receptacles. Put 'em down and open your ear balls!
Aside from that, as I said, only a hand full get the pleasure. I don't need to name names. For the rest, keep holding your breath, hell, you are blue here already, your heads are all about to explode.
When you get made Cpl is there a ceremony of sorts? If you wouldn't mind, do you think you could post some pictures on the forum of it?
Are you hoping to climb high up the ranks? Best of luck on opex.
 

DCLXVI

Legionnaire
#12
Yea, there is a ceremony. A gallan, your section, alcohol, and a tee shirt of your FG (and whatever number it is, was). Of course pics, you are asking a lot, aren't you? I am not hoping to climb up the ranks.
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#13
The official position of the Marine Corps is that there is no hazing... but, when you become a Marine Corps Corporal you receive your “Blood Stripesâ€￾. Blood Stripes originate from the US Mexican War, when we crushed Montezuma we had lost a lot of Non-commissioned and Commissioned Officers. To always remember all Marine NCOs and Officers wear the Blood Stripe, the 1 1/2" Red Stripe down your Trousers, 2" for Officers.

Now, blood striping, when you are promoted and when you are away from prying eyes you have to walk the gauntlet, the gauntlet is comprised of Marines equal to your new rank and above your new rank. So, as you walk the gauntlet there will be a Marine to your left and right, you will stop and they will “pin youâ€￾, at the same time both will punch you in the arm and also at the same time they will knee you along your outer leg, where the Blood Stripes on our trousers are worn. You end up with some very, very nasty bruises down your legs. You have been Blood Stripped, you are now properly a Marine Corps Non-commissioned Officer!

But again, anyone caught participating in hazing will be punished, it's the new Corps. But, behind closed doors, some traditions live on. I received my Blood Stripes when I was Meritoriously Promoted to Corporal during Operation Desert Storm, March of 1991, damn! I am old.
 
#14
(...) when you become a Marine Corps Corporal you receive your “Blood Stripesâ€￾. (...) You have been Blood Stripped, you are now properly a Marine Corps Non-commissioned Officer!
Hi USMCRET, does that mean that in the USMC (or generally speaking in the US armed forces), a corporal is considered an NCO? Not the case in the French military. A caporal is still considered an homme du rang (or rather, a militaire du rang, MDR, now there are women in the Army). Even caporaux-chefs (caporaux is the plural for caporal) are still, technically speaking, MDR, although those with a number of years of service can have some prerogatives normally reserved for NCOs. The NCO category starts at Sergent that would be the equivalent of Sergeant (pay grade E5) in the US Army.
 

ricktn40

Donator
Legionnaire
Elite Member
#15
It seems like most people do 2 years and then switch, is this usually how it works or is it just a coincidence?
They want you to spend at least 2 years in company combat then obtain a specialty now jobs have changed since my time but transmissions (communications) you were treated pretty good specifically if you transfer to CCS.
 

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