Hello everyone, why am I here?

#1
Good morning.
Thank you to have accepted me in the forum. Brief introduction: I'm a civilian, 25 years old, engineer. I've had intention to join la Légion étrangère for many years. I think I am meanly fit (able to 15 pull-ups, run up to 25 km, ruck march 20 kg/20 km, rope without leg, however nothing special), but… I have an issue with the knees, actually nothing surgical but slightly lesioned meniscus and slightly worn cartilages. Doctors said I can do any activity/sport, just looking for knees prevention (of course a civilian activity is not the legionnaire routine). Now I am trying my knees with 4 runs of 1 hour and 1 or 2 marches at week, and after marches knees hurts a little, but maybe this is common…. I would like to ask:
  • At the recruitment center they do some analysis to articulation (x-ray, MRI)?
  • Maybe there are legionnaires able to march and run with more serious problems (lack of a meniscus or similar)?
  • I suppose at the basic training mainly they run every day and march almost every day too. Am I correct?
I perfectly understand it is preferable to select a perfectly healthy guy, honestly I fear that if I'm lucky to pass selection, Pyrénées will break me down.
Thank you for any suggestion, sorry if these were already asked.
 
#2
Others can answer better but you sound good to go. Just be careful of your knee. If you didn't' have surgery and can run and hike you should be fine.

The knee stuff is common among athletes who train a lot and the trick it to just increase distances and intensity slowly slowly so your tendons, ligaments and muscles adapt without getting inflamed or damaged. (best to start at 2 days running and 1 day hiking and then only add another day if you have no pain, cut back distance a bit if you do, but just progressively add time or distance or add another day ...but only if no pain)

Everyone's knees hurt a bit after a long hike with weight. IF it is very painful then there is a problem. Make sure to drink a lot of water, ICE the knee when you are able and do a lot of stretching and leg lifts (Sit in a chair, lift leg like a leg extension and hold for 5 to 10 seconds with a hard squeeze and repeat for total of 15 times each leg). Do lots of hamstring, quadriceps and ITB stretches and for calves. This will really help you after training. Follow up with heat later when there is no inflammation or bad pain with a hot pack or a hot soak in a tub. Be diligent and you should be fine.

If you feel pain with 4 runs go back to 3 runs and 1 march and throw in swimming twice a week, less pressure on the knees but a great and intense workout for the body and legs.

Good luck.
 
#3
There are no special tests.. the doctor will take a look at them but no MRI etc. (imagine the cost of that....) As long as you don't mention it, it won't stop you from getting in.

But I would think about it long and hard. It's not just the running and marching, though those take their tolls too. But you'll be falling from a lot of places in the obstacle course, you'll do some hand to hand combat, there will be a lot more of that running and marching with backpacks, you'll fall down in the forest when running with the gear etc. You're already having knee issues at the age of 25... now I don't know how you got those issues in the first place but needless to say that it's not going to get any better with a military lifestyle.

Think about your health. If your knees are already fucked up, to the point where you think it's an issue (otherwise you wouldn't have made this post) then is it really worth it to see if you can fuck them up a bit more? Then again the medical procedures are pretty darn good nowadays so you can always get a partially new knee but I'd still recommend taking care of the original one.
 
#4
There are no special tests.. the doctor will take a look at them but no MRI etc. (imagine the cost of that....) As long as you don't mention it, it won't stop you from getting in.

But I would think about it long and hard. It's not just the running and marching, though those take their tolls too. But you'll be falling from a lot of places in the obstacle course, you'll do some hand to hand combat, there will be a lot more of that running and marching with backpacks, you'll fall down in the forest when running with the gear etc. You're already having knee issues at the age of 25... now I don't know how you got those issues in the first place but needless to say that it's not going to get any better with a military lifestyle.

Think about your health. If your knees are already fucked up, to the point where you think it's an issue (otherwise you wouldn't have made this post) then is it really worth it to see if you can fuck them up a bit more? Then again the medical procedures are pretty darn good nowadays so you can always get a partially new knee but I'd still recommend taking care of the original one.
Thank you both for the answers. I had some issue because I constantly run from many years. I want to try me knees resilience because if I will have some serious problems during home training it will be unpleasant but fine, if it will happen in the middle of basic training I do not know the consequences (of course I will be send with a kick ass at home, but maybe after some time en taule?).
If I do not try join now I will never. I am impressed how some legionnaires can serve for 5 of more years without compromise their legs due to daily exhausting activities, good genetic….
 
#5
also this might not mean much to you, because we always put ourselves first, but consider the fact that you might take someones spot in selection, and then u drop out of training cuz of something u knew in advance u had. someone else couldve made it through
 
#6
You'll certainly won't get time en taule if you have a medical problem during basic training that prevents you from completing the 4 months. If the Legion doctors consider this is something that can easily be healed (say, for example, a twisted ankle), you'll be sent to the hospital or infirmary and then resume the training (or start over from zero, depending how long the interruption was). If the docs consider your medical condition cannot be easily cured and will remain an issue for the months to come, then you'll be simply sent back to civilian life with a medical discharge paper.
Otherwise see whant Mammikoura wrote. A good summary of the risk you'd be taking.
 
#7
If you're a qualified engineer and determined to join the Legion, I'.am sure that some catered made to mesure arrangement will be cut to fill your suit.
Post Schitum : first impressions are always the best (make sure you bring with you, your diplomas)

Jeeze, la Légion has already enough street artists and Tae Kwon Do black dans... Engineers are a rare breed. How many cadres blancs have we?
 

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