[Question] Funeral Arrangements?

Cernunnos

Active Member
Pro Member
#1
I don't know if this is an inappropriate question or not but what does the Legion do for funerals? Will they follow instructions left behind by the person who has passed on, if it isn't too much of a hassle, or do the same thing for everyone? Anybody knows?
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
#2
I can tell you what happened with guy from Serbia who died in Afghanistan on his first mission. (2011). The FFL paid for his body to be transported to Serbia and also for funeral expenses. Also, officials and friends from FFL were present on funeral one year after when is tradition for family and friends to go to one's grave. 2 y after and as his father says many times they visited family. He was decorated with Légion d'honneur (Legion of Honour). His name was Goran Franjković (25) and was mentioned on the forum.
So, if you're planning to die Cernunnos :) you can leave instructions. I believe FFL would respect your desires if they are not too crazy. If not, they will do what your family's wishes are.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#4
Cernunnos. of course someone knows, but have a bit of patience because believe it or not, not everyone is poised behind their keyboard waiting to answer questions. If anyone else can answer Cernunnos' question all the better. Otherwise I'll answer it later on during the day.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#5
Well Cernunnos asked about Legion funerals and if the Legion respects the man’s last will and testament. First of all once you are in your regiment you will put down the person to inform in case of accident leading to death is the Chef de Corps (commanding officer). This does not mean that he is going to get your life insurance. It just means that someone has been informed that the person has died and the legion will take it from there. You will previously have been asked whom you want to be informed if something happens.

I only know of one person whose wishes were granted by the Legion in his will. A certain William Moll from Chicago. He had joined the Legion, did his 5 years and then went back to Chicago. He became a successful business man and died in the mid 30’s. I’m doing this from memory from my days in the museum. In his will he said that he wanted his ashes to be kept as close to the Legion as it was possible. I forget where they placed the urn whilst he was in Algeria, but I can tell you that they are now placed on the right hand side of the crypt in the museum of Aubagne. You will see a bronze plaque showing the exact spot.
There are others who are buried in Puyloubier, the general Rollet for one. And a Dane, the Prince Agde of Denmark who died of illness in Casablanca and then transferred to Sidi Bel Abbes before his final resting place in Domain Cne Danjou (Puyloubier) alongside the general and leg Zimmermann, the last legionnaire to be killed in combat in Algeria.

But that doesn’t answer Cernunnos' question.

Most regiment’s have a Legion cemetery. Basically it is for those who want to be buried in their garrison town or who have no – or cut all ties to family. However, for those who have family and wish to lay at rest close to their family… Let me recount what happened to a Cpl in the 13, Gary White, nicknamed Gungy White. I knew him, more or less whilst we were in the REP, I was CEA and he was 4th Cie. In the days the foyer was the place where everyone would guzzle beer. The German speakers to one side, the Anglais de merde (as we were known) to the other. Dotted here and there were the Spanish, Brazilians and Portuguese and the French would sit on the same tables that their buddy was on. This is before the wall came down and the generation Yoplait took over.

So I got an opportunity to the 13 as a life guard. I’ve mentioned this before so I’ll skip it. When I got there the swimming pool was being completely redone and rather than having me twiddling my thumbs for three weeks, I was put to work in the infirmary. On the second week there was a major exercise which includes live mortar firing. On one side is the 81 mm mortar’s and on the other 120 mm.
Gungy who had his arm in a cast was still sent out into the field as chief of an 81 mortar piece. During a respite in ‘hostilities’ the 81s were on standby. A major F up gave the 120s the position of the standby 81s. Fortunately most of them were brewing up behind a wall, except that Gungy had taken another legionnaire to check his 81. Gungy was killed outright and the legionnaire took shrapnel to the chest. I was on duty at the infirmary when the chief doctor sent over the message: confirm the legionnaire’s blood group, check the groups stocks, if need be call in same blood group…

And what was Gungy’s religion? Like I said it was too late to give him his last rites as he was killed instantly, but there was a Djiboutian Roman Catholic waiting when the body arrived. A couple of days later, I was picked with another medic to dress Gungy in his walking out uniform. But first had to come off the cast and then straighten the arm.

It’s worth pointing out that the body is frozen and that the casket will be a closed casket. But the military do respect the fallen and the Legion is no exception. So the top medic turns up with the saw and cuts away the cast. Then we have to re-break Gungy’s arm or we will not get his shirt on. I won’t go into the details of how to get a shirt and a pair of trousers on a dead body, but it’s not easy. All the Brits (anyone who was in the mafia), his section mates, and his other mates had a whip round. The Legion paid for his mother and father to come over for the ceremony and paid for the coffin to be returned to Scotland. A close friend of Gungy’s was taken by the PM’s to get the money that was collected exchanged into Sterling. I’m told that a delegation of the Amicale des Anciens de la Légion étrangère Scotland were present in force for his burial.
 
#7
(...) Let me recount what happened to a Cpl in the 13, Gary White, nicknamed Gungy White. I knew him, more or less whilst we were in the REP, I was CEA and he was 4th Cie. (...)
I had heard of Gary ‘Gungy’ White's death in Djibouti, but didn't know the details. So, the exercise was with live rounds ? Big f*ck up anyway. Was it hushed up or was an enquiry done?

(...) believe it or not, not everyone is poised behind their keyboard waiting to answer questions. (...)
Some of us are ! :)
Yep... And shouldn't be proud of it... [emoji3]
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#9
I had heard of Gary ‘Gungy’ White's death in Djibouti, but didn't know the details. So, the exercise was with live rounds ? Big f*ck up anyway. Was it hushed up or was an enquiry done? (...)
There was an inquiry done but it was hushed up, although everyone knew what had actually taken place. If you really want to know I can PM you the details as far as I had understood them. Not something that should be put out for all to see especially as I have no physical proof.
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#10
Well Cernunnos asked about Legion funerals and if the Legion respects the man’s last will and testament. First of all once you are in your regiment you will put down the person to inform in case of accident leading to death is the Chef de Corps (commanding officer). This does not mean that he is going to get your life insurance. It just means that someone has been informed that the person has died and the legion will take it from there. You will previously have been asked whom you want to be informed if something happens.

I only know of one person whose wishes were granted by the Legion in his will. A certain William Moll from Chicago. He had joined the Legion, did his 5 years and then went back to Chicago. He became a successful business man and died in the mid 30’s. I’m doing this from memory from my days in the museum. In his will he said that he wanted his ashes to be kept as close to the Legion as it was possible. I forget where they placed the urn whilst he was in Algeria, but I can tell you that they are now placed on the right hand side of the crypt in the museum of Aubagne. You will see a bronze plaque showing the exact spot.
There are others who are buried in Puyloubier, the general Rollet for one. And a Dane, the Prince Agde of Denmark who died of illness in Casablanca and then transferred to Sidi Bel Abbes before his final resting place in Domain Cne Danjou (Puyloubier) alongside the general and leg Zimmermann, the last legionnaire to be killed in combat in Algeria.

But that doesn’t answer Cernunnos' question.

Most regiment’s have a Legion cemetery. Basically it is for those who want to be buried in their garrison town or who have no – or cut all ties to family. However, for those who have family and wish to lay at rest close to their family… Let me recount what happened to a Cpl in the 13, Gary White, nicknamed Gungy White. I knew him, more or less whilst we were in the REP, I was CEA and he was 4th Cie. In the days the foyer was the place where everyone would guzzle beer. The German speakers to one side, the Anglais de merde (as we were known) to the other. Dotted here and there were the Spanish, Brazilians and Portuguese and the French would sit on the same tables that their buddy was on. This is before the wall came down and the generation Yoplait took over.

So I got an opportunity to the 13 as a life guard. I’ve mentioned this before so I’ll skip it. When I got there the swimming pool was being completely redone and rather than having me twiddling my thumbs for three weeks, I was put to work in the infirmary. On the second week there was a major exercise which includes live mortar firing. On one side is the 81 mm mortar’s and on the other 120 mm.
Gungy who had his arm in a cast was still sent out into the field as chief of an 81 mortar piece. During a respite in ‘hostilities’ the 81s were on standby. A major F up gave the 120s the position of the standby 81s. Fortunately most of them were brewing up behind a wall, except that Gungy had taken another legionnaire to check his 81. Gungy was killed outright and the legionnaire took shrapnel to the chest. I was on duty at the infirmary when the chief doctor sent over the message: confirm the legionnaire’s blood group, check the groups stocks, if need be call in same blood group…

And what was Gungy’s religion? Like I said it was too late to give him his last rites as he was killed instantly, but there was a Djiboutian Roman Catholic waiting when the body arrived. A couple of days later, I was picked with another medic to dress Gungy in his walking out uniform. But first had to come off the cast and then straighten the arm.

It’s worth pointing out that the body is frozen and that the casket will be a closed casket. But the military do respect the fallen and the Legion is no exception. So the top medic turns up with the saw and cuts away the cast. Then we have to re-break Gungy’s arm or we will not get his shirt on. I won’t go into the details of how to get a shirt and a pair of trousers on a dead body, but it’s not easy. All the Brits (anyone who was in the mafia), his section mates, and his other mates had a whip round. The Legion paid for his mother and father to come over for the ceremony and paid for the coffin to be returned to Scotland. A close friend of Gungy’s was taken by the PM’s to get the money that was collected exchanged into Sterling. I’m told that a delegation of the Amicale des Anciens de la Légion étrangère Scotland were present in force for his burial.
Brings a stinging tear to my eye. I had a first cousin follow me into the Corps. He was just promoted to Corporal and he had returned from his tour of duty on a Med Float, The Marine Corps always has a complete Expeditionary Force out in the Atlantic/Mediterranean and Pacific. Benjamin was killed one night after he returned, a drunk driving accident. Me being immediate family and a Marine Corps Staff Non-Commissioned Officer, I was asked to and did receive his body back in Louisiana. As the escort it was my job to open the casket in the funeral home before the body was presented for his funeral I had to ensure his Marine Corps Dress Blues Uniform was Immaculate, his Medals in order of Precedence upon his chest and that his feet were covered. Hardest damned thing I have ever done, that was until I was a Pall Bearer and I folded the flag draping his casket for presentation to my family. Why was it the hardest thing ever, because I had to have perfect Marine Corps Bearing throughout the funeral; however, after it was all over Joseph and I was in private with my wife I totally lost it.

You see all of you aspirants out there and pretenders this is what we mean by Esprit de Corps and Honor and Fidelity. I hope you earn the title and one day you will understand fully
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#12
Since 1962 when the Algerian war stopped, the Legion has lost more legionnaires to accidents, illness and suicides, than to combat.
The same with the Marine Corps, you would not believe the Motorcycle accidents killing you Marines, Training Accidents, and Illness. People do not realize the numbers of non-combat related deaths.
 

ricktn40

Donator
Legionnaire
Elite Member
#13
I don't know if this is an inappropriate question or not but what does the Legion do for funerals? Will they follow instructions left behind by the person who has passed on, if it isn't too much of a hassle, or do the same thing for everyone? Anybody knows?
The Legion will transport your remains to your home of record under escort I witnessed a few deaths and that's what they did 1 Brit, 1 French, 1 Polish.
 

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