Don't have a gym membership? Don't have weights? No excuses!

mulgarat

Actual or Ex Legionnaire - Donator
Legionnaire
#21
This is a good page beastskills I can do the 1 arm push up elbow in my problem though to much pushing not enough pulling exercises for chinnies would probably need 2 pulling exercises to get my chinnies up. The muscle up looks solid just a different grip on the bar .My upper body was always the strongest though in the infantry always the last man out the plank .
http://www.beastskills.com/the-muscle-up/
One arm chinnies read these take ages to learn solid
http://www.beastskills.com/one-arm-chin-up-pull-up/
Trick to the muscle up (on a bar) is explosiveness. When you transition from a pull up to a dip there is a slight adjustment on grip. Personally I use a normal grip, not a false grip, on the muscle up. The way to do it is to slightly propel your feet forward as you feel the point where you begin to swing back, pull yourself up with maximum force. Aim to get the bar to your nipples or lower. As you reach that point it is vital you bring your legs up and pitch your upper body over the bar otherwise you will automatically descend. Once stable in that position you can extend your forearm in to a dip. On descent, use the momentum at the bottom to propel yourself for a second muscle up, your body will be like a spring. The muscle up is not strict but it is far more technical than a cross fit kip muscle up.
Using resistance bands to help get muscle memory in training muscle up and other cali moves is helpful. I'm using a resistance band to help with one arm pull ups.
I recently got rings and getting used to them. Its like learning to walk again.
 
#22
Training for the military is a very interesting topic, and there seems to be a LOT of different views on how a soldier should train and what his physical skills should consist of. However, of obvious reasons, beeing a good runner and beeing good at walking with a backpack never gets old and in my opinion should be the basic.

When a soldiers aerobic conditioning is good enough - what should he do then? Would it be a good idea to add some strength and anaerobic exercise then?

Its very interesting to see the results in the US military after they hired a strength coach - Matt Wenning. He set the focus on building some serious strength, with doing lots of the traditional powerlifting exercises like squats and deadlifts and related exercises (If i remember correctly he once stated that a average soldier should be able to deadlift 180 kgs or something). They also did a lot of "functional" training specific for military, including lots of conditioning. One can google him and look at the workout etc.
The results? a drastic increase in strength (who doesnt want to be strong, you cant fake strong) and a drastic decrease in service-related injuries. Those exercises had a major impact on strenghtening the back, knees, shoulders etc, typical exposed injury-points for military personnel (and others).

Heck, maybe this strength training even would prevent injuries for night jumpers? :cool: ;)

Even tough i like this concept i really wonder how this strength training affected the running skills for the soldiers. I guess that body weight increased, which might have resulted in slower soldiers. Of course the soldiers isnt supposed to be as heavy as Matt Wenning himself. I also think that working out like this would be a little clumsy for the military. It requires lots of equipment and stuff, and considering that a lot of soldiers have to work out at the same time it makes it quite unrealistic to get the training succesfully done. It just gets too complicated.
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#23
Training for the military is a very interesting topic, and there seems to be a LOT of different views on how a soldier should train and what his physical skills should consist of. However, of obvious reasons, beeing a good runner and beeing good at walking with a backpack never gets old and in my opinion should be the basic.

When a soldiers aerobic conditioning is good enough - what should he do then? Would it be a good idea to add some strength and anaerobic exercise then?

Its very interesting to see the results in the US military after they hired a strength coach - Matt Wenning. He set the focus on building some serious strength, with doing lots of the traditional powerlifting exercises like squats and deadlifts and related exercises (If i remember correctly he once stated that a average soldier should be able to deadlift 180 kgs or something). They also did a lot of "functional" training specific for military, including lots of conditioning. One can google him and look at the workout etc.
The results? a drastic increase in strength (who doesnt want to be strong, you cant fake strong) and a drastic decrease in service-related injuries. Those exercises had a major impact on strenghtening the back, knees, shoulders etc, typical exposed injury-points for military personnel (and others).

Heck, maybe this strength training even would prevent injuries for night jumpers? :cool: ;)

Even tough i like this concept i really wonder how this strength training affected the running skills for the soldiers. I guess that body weight increased, which might have resulted in slower soldiers. Of course the soldiers isnt supposed to be as heavy as Matt Wenning himself. I also think that working out like this would be a little clumsy for the military. It requires lots of equipment and stuff, and considering that a lot of soldiers have to work out at the same time it makes it quite unrealistic to get the training succesfully done. It just gets too complicated.
Every USMC Camp has first rate fitness centers. Typically, not all the same, most units have Monday, Wednesday, and Friday PT. Monday is usually Platoon PT, Wednesday is for Company PT, and Friday is usually Motivational Battalion or Regimental PT. When not deployed or out training most Marines have lunch from 11:00 to 13:00 and they go to the Gym or out running again. At about 12:45 they grab a bit of lunch on their way back to their duty location. During the lunch period it is a mixed bag, some Marines lift weight, others do Aerobic Training, and other do some other form of Cardio Training.
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#24
Trick to the muscle up (on a bar) is explosiveness. When you transition from a pull up to a dip there is a slight adjustment on grip. Personally I use a normal grip, not a false grip, on the muscle up. The way to do it is to slightly propel your feet forward as you feel the point where you begin to swing back, pull yourself up with maximum force. Aim to get the bar to your nipples or lower. As you reach that point it is vital you bring your legs up and pitch your upper body over the bar otherwise you will automatically descend. Once stable in that position you can extend your forearm in to a dip. On descent, use the momentum at the bottom to propel yourself for a second muscle up, your body will be like a spring. The muscle up is not strict but it is far more technical than a cross fit kip muscle up.
Using resistance bands to help get muscle memory in training muscle up and other cali moves is helpful. I'm using a resistance band to help with one arm pull ups.
I recently got rings and getting used to them. Its like learning to walk again.
You explain a very good "Kip" motion. About 1/2 way through my career the Kip was banned from physical fitness tests, only a straight up and down motion, almost as if one were doing pull-ups in a cylinder.
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
#25
Every USMC Camp has first rate fitness centers. Typically, not all the same, most units have Monday, Wednesday, and Friday PT. Monday is usually Platoon PT, Wednesday is for Company PT, and Friday is usually Motivational Battalion or Regimental PT. When not deployed or out training most Marines have lunch from 11:00 to 13:00 and they go to the Gym or out running again. At about 12:45 they grab a bit of lunch on their way back to their duty location. During the lunch period it is a mixed bag, some Marines lift weight, others do Aerobic Training, and other do some other form of Cardio Training.
USMCRET , your posts are sometimes really motivational. I was little bit lazy, didn't plan to do my "before bed" push up, sit up, aBS routine. But after reading your message... F-it. Now im doing it. ! ;)
 

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