Compiled List of recommended books

CanadianFFL

Super Active Member
#24
Anyone read Our Friends beneath the Sands: The Foreign Legion in France's Colonial Conquests 1870-1935? I'd like top read it if it was good.

"Thanks to countless films and books, an entire mythology surrounds the French Foreign Legion and the anonymous, desperate men who fought and died under the desert sun. But the reality is far richer, and Martin Windrow describes it in gripping detail, including the colonial missions in North Africa and Vietnam, the imperative to build empire, and the impact of Islamic fundamentalism."
 
M

Martin Scott

Unregistered
#25
Anyone read Our Friends beneath the Sands: The Foreign Legion in France's Colonial Conquests 1870-1935? I'd like top read it if it was good.

"Thanks to countless films and books, an entire mythology surrounds the French Foreign Legion and the anonymous, desperate men who fought and died under the desert sun. But the reality is far richer, and Martin Windrow describes it in gripping detail, including the colonial missions in North Africa and Vietnam, the imperative to build empire, and the impact of Islamic fundamentalism."
Feck me sounds like a Mills and Boon Novel.
 
#27
I'd rather write a book (or do something worth writing one about) than read a book.
The art of war is a good book, but to be honest it is all practically common sense if you sit and think about each section for a few minutes, and can be summed up in a pointy power pointy presentation.
my 2c
 
#28
"Ghost Force" by Ken Connor. I originally picked it up because I was told it had an excellent section on Aden, where my grandfather had served in the 60s. Not only was it very informative about the Aden Emergency, the rest of it was top notch too. I ended up reading the whole thing cover to cover in one afternoon and I've read it many times since.
 
O

Ossis. O

Unregistered
#29
Pick up a copy of Ashes of Vietnam,Australian Voices by Stuart Rintoul.Published mid 80's.It will literally rip your guts out.Most of the veterans interviewed in the book committed suicide.R.I.P
 

Hitsuji

Hyper Active Member
#31
Yes The Art of War is one of my favorite books.

Just one thing guys, it would be best to not quote the original post. Otherwise we will be scrolling down the page for five minutes to see new posts.
It is also one of my favorites, have you read Miyamoto Musashis "Book of five rings" ? It is an awesome book for martial artist and since its also strategy it can apply to other areas as well, I would recommend it to anyone who can handle philosophy and little deep thinking. Musashi was an outstanding samurai and gives advices how warriors should live, train and behave.
 
O

Ossis. O

Unregistered
#32
"Ghost Force" by Ken Connor. I originally picked it up because I was told it had an excellent section on Aden, where my grandfather had served in the 60s. Not only was it very informative about the Aden Emergency, the rest of it was top notch too. I ended up reading the whole thing cover to cover in one afternoon and I've read it many times since.
Once asked a mate of mine here in the Oz SAS why they were all writing books.His reply...because wankers buy them.True story.
 
#34
A few books I'd like to add to that list:

"The Mission, The Men, and Me" by Pete Blaber

"Five Years to Freedom" by James N. Rowe

"SOG: The Secret Wars of America's Commandos in Vietnam" by John L. Plaster
 
#35
WAR by Sebastian Junger.

An account of his time embedded with a platoon of the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team in the Korengal valley in Afghanistan in 2007. Very good read. Junger made the film Restrepo together with the late Tim Hetherington. The book covers the same platoon and tour.
 
#36
I recommend reading the book: "The Dictator's Handbook: Why Bad Behavior is Almost Always Good Politics", written by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita & Alastair Smith and published in 2011.

For eighteen years, Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith have been part of a team revolutionizing the study of politics by turning conventional wisdom on its head. They start from a single assertion: Leaders do whatever keeps them in power. They don't care about the “national interestâ€￾—or even their subjects—unless they have to.
This clever and accessible book shows that the difference between tyrants and democrats is just a convenient fiction. Governments do not differ in kind but only in the number of essential supporters, or backs that need scratching. The size of this group determines almost everything about politics: what leaders can get away with, and the quality of life or misery under them. The picture the authors paint is not pretty. But it just may be the truth, which is a good starting point for anyone seeking to improve human governance.
Here is a video summary of the main ideas of the book:

[video=youtube;rStL7niR7gs]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rStL7niR7gs[/video]
 

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