About “la taule” and 17 years of service

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#61
Thanks to all of you for these additional details. I think that Johnny's story helps me understand what's happening with my son !

Good idea to go to a Camerone ceremony : where does it take place and how does one get a ticket (or anything else) for that ?

Am I correct to assume it takes place on May 1st ?
Thadeusz, no need for a ticket. All the info on Camerone can be found on the internet. Can you post a couple of photos of your son and the regiment so we can see the changes (in the regiment).
Actually now that I think of it you should ask your son what is taking place during Camerone. It can differ from one regiment to another.
 

thadeusz

Active Member
#62
Thadeusz, no need for a ticket. All the info on Camerone can be found on the internet. Can you post a couple of photos of your son and the regiment so we can see the changes (in the regiment).
Actually now that I think of it you should ask your son what is taking place during Camerone. It can differ from one regiment to another.
Thanks Joseph for this information. I will try to get photos of my son and post them (if I do succeed to post a photo, otherwise can I send it to you by mail ? )
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#63
Yes you can. Just a question, if your only contact with your son is by standard mail, how did your son get them to you. BTW, he should still have his old email address, have you tried contacting him. And of course everyone is on facebook nowadays.
Let me know as soon as you get the photos.
 
#64
Yes you can. Just a question, if your only contact with your son is by standard mail, how did your son get them to you. BTW, he should still have his old email address, have you tried contacting him. And of course everyone is on facebook nowadays.
Let me know as soon as you get the photos.
I may be one of the few that does not have face book, or any other social media account I still send post cards and letters via snail mail. Apart from e bay and this form I don’t really use the Internet but love book shops and the guardian news paper!
 
#66
I may be one of the few that does not have face book, or any other social media account I still send post cards and letters via snail mail. Apart from e bay and this form I don’t really use the Internet but love book shops and the guardian news paper!
I always adore the old school mode but my friends and family turn to freak out and be angry with me so I have to resent to modern ways of contacting people.
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#68
Hi Thadeusz, just wondering the other day that I never heard back from you. As for going to see your son in Calvi at Camerone, it might be an idea to book your hotel room as early as possible. Even now would be the right time. As you are retired it shouldn't be much of a burden to you calendar wise.

Camerone falls on a Monday this year, so you could book the weekend and also Monday and Tuesday. You will have to book in advance, because the "island of beauty" will already be packed with tourists. That would give you the weekend to look around Calvi and the Monday and Tuesday to visit the regiment.

I have a friend who goes there every year, maybe she could look out for him? What's his legion name? Also when you get chance can you post the photo you promised?

Let me know when you decide to go and if you have any questions about Calvi.
 

jonny

Actual or Former Legionnaire
Legionnaire
#69
One of my favourite songs from Algeria (if I can figure out how to do it).


Ok, it’s called Mustapha anyway and is on youtube.

Glad I could be of some help Thadeusz.
 

jonny

Actual or Former Legionnaire
Legionnaire
#71
On n’a pas tous les jours vingt ans....

Another memory from a bar on a Sunday afternoon in Philippeville, Algeria. This song was playing and the barmaid said you look about 20 years old, and I was.

 

USMCRET

Active Member
#72
One of my favourite songs from Algeria (if I can figure out how to do it).


Ok, it’s called Mustapha anyway and is on youtube.

Glad I couls be ofsome help Thadeusz
Algerian version of American Band Stand, LOL


Jonny, did you do any of these moves? Begins at about 1:30 into the clip
 
Last edited:
#73
One of my favourite songs from Algeria (if I can figure out how to do it).
Ok, it’s called Mustapha anyway anyway.
Bob Azzam, an Egyptian singer of Lebanese descent, became very popular in France in the early 60s with his parodies of oriental songs.
In the same vein, he also sang “Fais-moi du couscous chérie.”
 

jonny

Actual or Former Legionnaire
Legionnaire
#74
And then, of course, it was the one and only Édith Piaf singing unforgettable songs on every bar’s radio. What a lovely time I lived there in Algeria! I was lucky, indeed. Great memories.


Algerian version of American Band Stand, LOL


Jonny, did you do any of these moves? Begins at about 1:30 into the clip
Of course! Picked up a few girls like that. That’s when dancing was fun!
 

USMCRET

Active Member
#75
Of course! Picked up a few girls like that. That’s when dancing wasfun!
Jonny, man no matter what age or era, if you can dance you are in and you can command, that is have most girls.

Bob Azzam, an Egyptian singer of Lebanese descent, became very popular in France in the early 60s with his parodies of oriental songs.
In the same vein, he also sang “Fais-moi du couscous chérie.”
“Fais-moi du couscous chérie.” Forgive my ignorance, my translation from HS French and a College Course,

for me...? My Love
 

dusaboss

Hyper Active Member
#76

This is '67. Wow that look so lost in time. I think in age when that was recorded music already became much more interesting. If there is no year I would say that is early 50s on video
 
#77
“Fais-moi du couscous chérie.” Forgive my ignorance, my translation from HS French and a College Course,

for me...? My Love
Literally translated it means “do me (cook me) some couscous, honey (or darling)”. Couscous is a typical dish from North Africa. A mix of meat (mutton and/or chicken, meatballs and merguez which are hot thin mutton sausages), steam cooked vegetables and couscous (an Arabic word, in French semoule, don't know the English translation) which are fine dried grains of wheat flour, steam cooked and then mixed with butter. The whole stuff is accompanied by a hot sauce made of diluted harissa (another Arabic word, adopted ‘as is’ in French, a sort of paste made of mashed red hot chili peppers, garlic and various spices). It’s yummy :).
 

Joseph Cosgrove

Moderator
Legionnaire
#78
Harissa is also nicknamed Marseille's ketchup. I agree with Rapace, couscous is yummy. Anyone joining up in Aubagne should take the time to go out for a couscous in Marseille, one of my favorite dishes. I think semoule is semolina in English. North Africans use it also to make taboulé.
 
#79
The spicey sauce used in couscous, is ras el hanout red or yellow. Harissa (from Tunisia) is a spicey spread, goes well with merguez (oriental sausages) and bread (khobz)... .= a hot dog, if you prefer.
Taboulé, originates from Lebanon/Syria... Served cold, it's flavoured with chopped mint leaves and is very refreshing in summer.
 

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